Articles

SEO Report Card: Yarnware.com

September 1st, 2006

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Originally published in Practical Ecommerce

Meredith Bright of Yarnware writes: â??I used to have much better organic search rankings, but they have been dropping recently. I canâ??t figure out what is wrong.â?? It wasnâ??t hard to see why. The site is running Lotus Notes Domino â??â?? not a platform that is very friendly to search engines because of its long, complex-looking URLs. However, the issues with the site were much more fundamental. The www.yarnware.com site has broken some cardinal rules of SEO.

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All About Site Searchiness

August 30th, 2006

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Originally published in ClickZ

What are the key factors that separate websites that are found on page 1 in the search results from those on page 5? Pat Fusco, Netconcepts’ lead search strategist went on to elaborate in this article for ClickZ. It all comes down to the site’s search-worthiness (or searchiness Pat calls it). She suggests starting out by taking a panoramic view of your industry on the Web and the sites of your top ranking rivals. There’s much to learn here. The road to top rankings is paved, first and foremost, with keyword selection, and there are tools to help you achieve this, as well as those all-important links to your website.

“Classic” SEO

August 16th, 2006

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Originally published in ClickZ

The term “vintage” is really trendy right now, but does it apply to SEO as well? In this article for ClickZ, Netconcepts’ lead search strategist Pat Fusco went on to define the difference between “antique” (100 years old) and “classic” (25 years old) which means IBM’s entry in 1981 with the IBM 5150 is now a bona fide classic. The world’s first website was designed in 1991 — not a classic yet. How about the world’s first SEO marketer? Perhaps the word classic should be used to define classic SEO as being the basics of good practice that delivers positive results that improve the bottom line of the companies who use them.

PPC: In or Out Part 2

August 2nd, 2006

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Originally published in ClickZ

In part 2 of this article for ClickZ, Netconcepts’ lead search strategist Pat Fusco goes on to say that while PPC advertising and SEO strategies may have the common foundation of keyword research, that’s where the similarities end.

Should you hire an in-house SEM, external agency, or both? Pat says it primarily depends on your online marketing goals, marketing budget and risk management mindset.

What about buying your way into top rankings? There are seven fundamentals of any PPC campaign as Pat highlights…

Harness the Power of CSS

August 1st, 2006

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Originally published in Practical Ecommerce

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a technology popular with web developers who care about web standards and accessibility. But it should also be a technology embraced by anyone who cares about SEO. You can do amazing things with CSS.

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SEO Report Card: KayakFishingStuff.com

August 1st, 2006

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Originally published in Practical Ecommerce

In many ways this site was a breath of fresh air. From an SEO standpoint, Kayak Fishing Stuff is doing a number of things right, and it shows in their No. 1 rankings in Google for â??kayak fishing,” “fishing kayakâ?? and “fishing kayaks.” Of course, there is still room for improvement, but it is more a case of finessing and fine-tuning than throwing away the whole site and starting again.

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SEO: In or Out, Part 1

July 19th, 2006

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Originally published in ClickZ

Online entities, large and small, are asking questions. Will they save money by hiring an in-house search engine marketer (SEM), or should they outsource to a team of professionals? Netconcepts’ lead search strategist Pat Fusco writing for ClickZ says a company’s marketing goals and budget will largely determine the answer. However, she says SEO is an ongoing process and, many larger organisations cannot see the forest for the trees.

“Working with an agency helps in-house marketers stay on top of shifts and changes on the Web and in other industries that could affect the company’s ongoing online marketing strategy. As a result, the insight an agency offers can be invaluable to the business.”

SEO: Blogging Your Way to the Top

July 1st, 2006

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Originally published in Practical Ecommerce

Search engines, Google in particular, seem to love blogs. This is in part due to the fact that search engines rely heavily on links for their ranking algorithms, and the blogosphere is rich with interlinkages. Bloggers constantly link to each other – through “hat tips,” “blogrolls,” “trackbacks,” and so forth. Furthermore, blogs tend to be heavy on content and light on search-engine-unfriendly features like overly complex URLs, frames, JavaScript-based links and Flash. I’ve seen new blogs quickly penetrate Google’s top results where a brandnew, traditional website might have languished in the “Google sandbox” for a number of months…

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SEO Report Card: Zearth.Blogspot.com

July 1st, 2006

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Originally published in Practical Ecommerce

Zearth.comâ??s staff operates a blog at zearth.blogspot.com, although they are relatively new to the concept. They signed up for a free Blogger.com blog, which wasnâ??t ideal as youâ??ll soon discover. The traffic into the blog is only a trickle, but they have received a couple thousand dollars in sales because of it, so itâ??s a start.

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The Shifting SEO Landscape

June 26th, 2006

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Originally published in DM News

Search engine optimization will undergo a huge transformation over the next several years. No longer will you be able to track your position for particular keywords and know for certainty that those rankings are what your consumers are seeing. Why? Because personalization, intention and geographical location will all be taken into account to deliver a unique set of search results to each individual searcher.

SEO is going to be a very different ball game, so a more sustainable approach is to focus on mining “the Long Tail” — those products or keywords that are in low demand but, given a large enough catalog/portfolio, can collectively add up to the majority of your business.

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