Seminars

Advanced Usenet & Email Marketing

Value-Added Marketing on the Internet — San Francisco, CA

April 29th, 1997

Seminar by

An often overlooked marketing opportunity on the Internet is Usenet and email. There are over 10,000 newsgroups, each one on a distinctly different topic. In addition, there are many thousands more discussion groups conducted over email. At the most basic level, businesses need to be aware of where their company, products, services, or competitors are currently or might in the future be discussed, and how they can conduct business effectively in these discussion groups.

A company can create newsgroups, moderate them, archive them on their Web site, and write FAQs for them. Being “first to market” with such services could provide you a great deal of visibility to your target audience, and best of all, will practically “lock out” your competitors. In this non-technical, information-packed session, you will learn about:

  • Discussion groups: on email “listservs”, Usenet newsgroups, and the Web
  • Setting up a Usenet newsgroup
  • Moderated vs. unmoderated discussion groups
  • Driving traffic into your Web site with discussion group archives
  • The benefits of writing a Usenet FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)
  • Email newsletters/announcements
  • Personal Notification Services

One-To-One Marketing to the Extreme: Personalizing Your Site To Each User

Value-Added Marketing on the Internet — San Francisco, CA

April 28th, 1997

Seminar by

World Wide Web marketing is about one-to-one marketing of value-added services and information to the Internet user. One can market on the Internet most effectively by catering to the individual through customization. A number of high-profile companies on the Web are offering such “personalized” web sites, including InfoSeek (“InfoSeek Personal”), Ziff-Davis (“Personal View”), Bank of America (“Build Your Own Bank”), Amazon.com (“Personal Notification Service”), Netscape (“My Page”), and Microsoft Network (“Custom Start Page”), to name a few.

Personalizing your web site to each user gives you the opportunity to deliver a tailored message to an infinite number of target markets. Your web site can change based on the user’s buying and surfing habits, his past usage of your site, his demographics, his relationship to your company, and a multitude of other attributes which you could collect from your users online or cull from your corporate legacy databases. For example, imagine a customer who is surfing an online computer catalog and purchases a pack of floppy disks. Two weeks later he returns to the site and finds that floppy disks are “On Sale” that week. What he doesn’t realize is that he is the only person receiving the sale price, based on his recent purchasing patterns.

This type of “mass customization” makes a user’s visit more efficient and productive, thus saving him time and money. It encourages customer self-service. By catering to individual needs on a personal level, you foster self-reliance and lower support costs. Personalization also makes it possible to track visitors and correlate web site usage data with customer profiles. So not only does such a strategy allow you to do targeted value-added marketing, but also the user profiles and patterns that you collect will provide invaluable data for your marketing departments!

This in-depth, half-day workshop, is specifically designed for non-technical marketing and customer service professionals. We will:

  • Explore basic concepts, terms, practices, and directions
  • Examine closely a number of successful personalized web sites and analyze, in detail, the characteristics of their success
  • Illustrate exactly how these companies are creating a personalized experience for each user, thus creating satisfied
    customers and ultimately reducing costs, and most importantly…
  • Show you how to apply these techniques to your own online marketing and sales venture
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The Future of Internet Marketing

American Marketing Association - Madison Chapter Monthly Seminar — Madison, WI

April 7th, 1997

Seminar by

The Internet is changing the way we do business — the way we market, sell, service, distribute, communicate, and work. Businesses are already beginning to communicate with customers, distributors, suppliers, shareholders, and employees in a way that is truly one-to-one and real-time. “Personalized” web sites are delivering tailored messages to an infinite number of target markets. These sites can change based on the user’s buying and surfing habits, past usage of the site, demographics, relationship to the company, and a multitude of other attributes which could be collected from the users online or culled from corporate legacy databases. The Internet has also become the most economical distribution system of information available. Companies can ship “bits” – weightless electrons – around the world at the speed of light, for a fraction of what it costs to ship heavy “atoms” at the speed of freight.

In just a few years the Internet will be as essential of a business tool as what the phone and FAX are today. Intranets, real-time transaction processing, and “customer self-service” are just the beginning. We are transitioning from static sites to dynamic and personalized sites, from broadcasting to narrowcasting, from information dissemination to actual commerce. But, we can also look forward to an “infoglut” of unimaginable proportions, Web sites that run into the millions of dollars to build and maintain, and massive data warehouses about consumers that are networked together across companies and continents. Imagine, personal (software) agents will surf the Web in our place, and thus Web sites of future will be designed more for our agents than for us. And privacy will be a thing of the past: web sites will know your buying patterns, your interests, your salary, your level of education, even your credit record.

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Using the Internet for Competitive Intelligence

Competitive Intelligence: PDMA Spring Conference — Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN

April 4th, 1997

Seminar by

  • Tapping into your competitors
  • Benchmarking web site performance
  • Competitor profiles & news
  • Counterintelligence on your web site
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“Killer” Customer Service over the Internet

Internet Strategies for Customer Service and Support — Atlanta, GA

March 20th, 1997

Workshop by

This is the workshop you’ve been waiting for – a LIVE Internet connection
so you can see what the buzz is all about, while an expert in Internet-based
customer service explains what it all means! Customer service departments looking to “get on the Net” need to prepare for the opportunities, pitfalls,
and competitive market niches that are being created in Cyberspace.

This in-depth, half-day workshop specifically designed for non-technical
customer service professionals prepares you to more fully participate in the marketplace. Basic concepts, terms, practices, and directions will be clearly defined and demonstrated. A number of successful online customer service centers will be closely examined, as we analyze in detail the characteristics of their success. We’ll illustrate exactly how these companies are creating satisfied customers and reducing operational costs. And most importantly, you’ll learn in this interactive workshop how to apply those techniques to your own online customer service venture. Demonstrations and discussions will include:

  • Auto-response email
  • Following up with personal email
  • Answering their questions before they ask them! Frequently Asked Questions
    with answers
  • Getting customers to help each other: online discussion groups
  • Getting your data out there: online libraries of technical specifications,
    ties with corporate systems (e.g. FedEx)
  • Putting it at their fingertips: using search engines and hierarchical
    indices
  • Personalized web pages and automated personal notification services
    by email

Get a jump on your competition and get the solid foundation you need to succeed in this exciting new customer service venue by joining us for this one-of-a-kind workshop!

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Strategies for Streamlining Online Customer Service

Internet Strategies for Customer Service and Support — Atlanta, GA

March 19th, 1997

Seminar by

How can you get the most out of your online customer service? This extraordinary presentation will demonstrate a combination of both automated and self-regulating methods for providing customer service online. You will discover that you can significantly reduce your staffing costs with these techniques :

  • Auto-response email boxes
  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) with answers
  • Integrating your FAQs with email responses
  • Email newsletters/announcements
  • Email-based discussion groups (“listservs”)
  • Web-based discussion groups
  • Usenet-based discussion groups (“newsgroups”)
  • Intelligent search engines for your web site (both keyword- and concept-based)
  • Online databases that can be updated automatically by your customers via the Web
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Internet Video (panel)

Spring Internet World — Los Angeles, CA

March 12th, 1997

Panel Moderated by

Deploying video over today’s Internet is like teaching a dog to sing – it’s unpleasant and it annoys the dog. Nevertheless, advances in compression technology, new bandwidth reservation protocols, streaming techniques and the promise of more robust backbones and higher-capacity delivery systems make it likely to arrive sooner than you think. See the state-of-the-art today and find out what the videonet of the future might look like.

One-To-One Internet Marketing: An Online Demonstration

Loyalty Programs that Work Conference — New York City, NY

February 6th, 1997

Workshop by

World Wide Web marketing is about one-to-one marketing of value-added services and information to the Internet user. The Internet gives companies a unique opportunity to relate to customers and potential customers on a new level, catering to their needs and wants on an individual basis. This strategy of “mass customization” not only saves the customer time and money by making their visit more efficient and productive, but also provides valuable customer profile and market research data. This half-day workshop will give you a better understanding of one-to-one marketing on the Internet, preparing you to more fully participate in the marketplace.

This workshop is specifically designed for non-technical marketing professionals. Using a LIVE Internet connection so you can see what the buzz is all about, an expert in Internet marketing and technology will explain what it all means!

Basic concepts, terms, practices, and directions will be clearly defined
and demonstrated. These incude:

  • Value-added marketing (content beyond products)
  • Personalization (web pages tailored to the individual user)
  • Ergonomic web site design (page layout; form vs. function)
  • Engaging the user through interactivity
  • Ties to corporate systems (interfacing customer, product, and/or HR
    databases to the web)
  • Java, VRML, Shockwave, and other enabling technologies
  • Promotion strategies (listing with search engines, subject indices like
    Yahoo, industry-specific sites, etc.; reciprocal links, advertising)

Several noteworthy web sites will be closely examined, as we analyze in detail the characteristics of their success. I’ll illustrate exactly how these web sites are:

  • Increasing sales
  • Cutting costs
  • Generating advertising and subscription revenue
  • Obtaining market research information
  • Generating traffic and motivating repeat visitors
  • Winning awards and gaining recognition
  • Outshining their competition

“Killer” Customer Service over the Internet

Internet Strategies for Customer Service and Support — Chicago, IL

October 2nd, 1996

Workshop by

This is the workshop you’ve been waiting for – a LIVE Internet connection
so you can see what the buzz is all about, while an expert in Internet-based
customer service explains what it all means! Customer service departments
looking to “get on the Net” need to prepare for the opportunities, pitfalls,
and competitive market niches that are being created in Cyberspace.

This in-depth, half-day workshop specifically designed for non-technical
customer service professionals prepares you to more fully participate in
the marketplace. Basic concepts, terms, practices, and directions will be
clearly defined and demonstrated. A number of successful online customer
service centers will be closely examined, as we analyze in detail the characteristics
of their success. We’ll illustrate exactly how these companies are creating
satisfied customizers and reducing operational costs. And most importantly,
you’ll learn in this interactive workshop how to apply those techniques
to your own online customer service venture. Demonstrations and discussions
will include:

  • Auto-response email
  • Following up with personal email
  • Answering their questions before they ask them! Frequently Asked Questions
    with answers
  • Getting customers to help each other: online discussion groups
  • Getting your data out there: online libraries of technical specifications,
    ties with corporate systems (e.g. FedEx)
  • Putting it at their fingertips: using search engines and hierarchical
    indices
  • Personalized web pages and automated personal notification services
    by email

Get a jump on your competition and get the solid foundation you need to
succeed in this exciting new customer service venue by joining us for this
one-of-a-kind workshop!

Strategies for Streamlining Online Customer Service

Internet Strategies for Customer Service and Support — Chicago, IL

September 30th, 1996

Seminar by

How can you get the most out of your online customer service? This extraordinary presentation will demonstrate a combination of both automated and self-regulating methods for providing customer service online. You will discover that you can significantly reduce your staffing costs with these techniques:

  • Auto-response email boxes
  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) with answers
  • Integrating your FAQs with email responses
  • Email newsletters/announcements
  • Email-based discussion groups (“listservs”)
  • Web-based discussion groups
  • Usenet-based discussion groups (“newsgroups”)
  • Intelligent search engines for your web site (both keyword- and concept-based)
  • Online databases that can be updated automatically by your customers via the Web
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